professional development resources

PD Resource: Passwords 101 Lesson

I have been overseeing one of our governor’s school students as part of her community service. Emily seeks to work in cyber security in the future, and part of her project involves community service. We teamed up so that she could teach other teachers about the basics involved with cyber security through 30 minute professional development sessions. Her first lesson is on passwords.

Name: Passwords 101
Creator: This lesson was designed by BRVGS student Emily. I oversaw her work and creation, but the ideas inside are entirely hers.
Description: This lesson shows the audience how to create a secure password using a simple algorithm. Learners will be able to strength test their old passwords, determine the characteristics of good/bad passwords, and create their own sample password based on the presented algorithm

Passwords 101 Lesson

Feedback is appreciated. @tisinaction on Twitter or comment here!

 

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Student Designed Cyber Security PD for Teachers

For the past couple of weeks I have been working with a BRVGS student named Emily. Emily is a senior working on her final project for the governor’s school program, and one part of the project involves community service. She is interested in the cyber security field, and so her lead teacher suggested she team up with me, as I teach professional development to other teachers. Her goal for her service is to design and teach lessons on cyber security issues that teachers and others face online

I’ve been very pleased with the team up so far, as Emily is a very hard working student. I showed her how teachers begin to design and plan lessons, and she took to it like a fish to water. She decided the easiest thing to start with would be a lesson on passwords. She did a lot of research, and we narrowed down her ideas to teaching how to create password algorithms for a user. There are many different ways to create an algorithm for this, but Emily had found one that seemed to be pretty easy.

We planned and developed her lesson. She started with a hook that talked about what happens with easy passwords and how one person used this to his advantage with government servers. She has a link to a password strength test website where the audience can test the strength of their old passwords and see how long it might take a hacker to crack them. From there, she works with the audience to identify characteristics of good and bad passwords. With that in mind, she goes over the algorithm step by step, using the example of creating a password for a Google account. The audience then practices by creating a password with the algorithm for Facebook. Finally, she wraps up the lesson and asks a couple of exit questions.

Once she had all of her ideas out and in order, we worked on adding explanations. I wanted her lessons to be able to be understood by anyone looking over them, especially anyone who judges her final BRVGS portfolio. I created a simple lesson plan template for her to use, and she copied and pasted her lesson ideas into that so that things were neat and organized. She then decided to create a handout of the algorithm steps. I had to laminate a couple of copies for her teaching use, and then I also made plain copies so that teachers could take it with them.

It was a lot of work, and I hope she has been able to discover how much work can go into just one lesson plan. She’s enjoyed it though, and she’s ready to begin doing research for her next lesson. Now that she has one lesson plan under her belt, this one might turn out to be a little easier for her.

Though the lesson plan has been finished, Emily is not done just yet. She is gearing up to teach the lesson to teachers. She has practiced with family at home, and has brought a friend to my office space so I could listen as she taught the lesson to the friend. We currently have 1 teacher booked for a lesson in the next couple of weeks, and have some more to ask. Emily is planning to gather feedback from those teachers after each lesson, and I am giving them PD credit for helping out a student.

I hope to provide another update after we have worked with some of the teachers. I know Emily is going to do a great job. I know that I have already learned a lot from her, and I’m hoping other teachers will feel the same way.

Want Emily’s lesson? You can get it here!

 

Tired of Your District Not Offering More PD?

Are you tired of your district not offering the PD that YOU want?

Are you tired of going to the same sessions year after year, and wondering “What’s in this for me?”

Have you just had enough of it all?

Then this is the post for you! Yes, we’ve all been down that road before. The district doesn’t offer the PD you want, or it offers hardly anything related to PD. They tell you there’s not enough money to send you to that coveted training or workshop, and you’re running low on funds to send yourself. Yes, these things are all certainly the pits.

However, educators have found ways around this tired cycle, and they are happily taking control of their own learning. After reading this post, you can, too! That’s amazing. Imagine no longer have to wait for anyone to give you the PD you want. In fact, you’ll wonder how you made it this far without it!

In this day and age, there is no need to wait for your district to offer you PD. A culture of open sharing and connecting in education has changed the bygone days of being isolated and alone. Educators are finding communities online where they can share and take resources and ideas for implementation in their classroom. They talk, they discuss, they read, and they write. They wait for no one, and they take what they want.

Sounds great, doesn’t it? You can be a part of this crowd, too! There are many ways to do so, but one of the easiest is by using Twitter and Tweetdeck in combination. Now before you brush Twitter aside as something celebrities use to insert foot into mouth, stop and think. Twitter itself is not the game changer. The educators that are there are the game changers. They start the discussions and share thoughts and ideas. How do you know if an educator is connected online? Look around their classroom and see if you can spot trends that seem outside of what the district has introduced. That’s your first sign.

Here’s how to get started:

  • Create a Twitter account
  • Log into Tweetdeck with your Twitter account
  • Search for hashtags in your area or interest
  • Tweetdeck will create columns for each hashtag
  • Use Twitter or Tweetdeck to create lists of folks in similar categories (STEAM, Edtech, etc)
  • Google your favorite educators to see if they have a Twitter handle to follow
  • Leave Tweetdeck running in the background and check when you can
  • Retweet what stands out to you

That’s all you have to do. You don’t even have to share at first. Granted, the list above doesn’t go into details, but you can easily Google instructions or watch YouTube videos. If that fails, ask a colleague for help! We are not so expert that we don’t need help every now and again. There are many folks willing to help you out if you only reach out to them.

Want other ways to get started? Here are just some of many:

  • Find a book that you want to read and go for it
    • Look for book study groups online, or start your own
    • Don’t want to write? Try using Voxer to document learning
    • Read, Reflect, Try, and Reflect again!
  • Look for Facebook groups of teachers to connect with.
  • Find online communities for your organizations
  • Seek webinars on the topic of your choice. Some cost, but not all

When we take control of our learning, then there is nothing that can stand in our way. Instead of saying “I can’t get the PD I want because my district doesn’t offer it”, say “What are some ways I can learn about Topic X on my own?” Reframe the way you look at the challenge, and you’ll find it’s just a little bit easier to learn what you want to learn.

Want help getting started? This friendly ITRT is at your service. I would be happy to work with you to get you started on your journey. Just comment below!

HyperDoc Resource: Google Classroom PD

This is the hyperdoc I mentioned in my previous post on failing. It’s okay though because I fixed it and am now ready to share it with others who offer professional development to staff.

Name: Creating the Right Google Classroom for Your Class
Description: This hyperdoc is done with the Hero’s Journey template. It encourages teachers to explore first, and the mentor section is a demonstration that teachers can follow along with. Teachers have the chance to set up their classroom and have access to resources on ways to use it right away.

I have added two sections to this template. The first is a Reflection piece, where I have space for a survey to be inserted. The second is Hero’s Backpack, which was a space where I added more video resources for participants to refer back to after the session has ended. This was a request from my staff. If you feel that one or both of these sections do not suit your needs, feel free to remove them.

The only link that you will need to insert is a link to your own Padlet. This section is clearly marked in the document. You will also want to change the wording of parts of the document that refer to ITRTs. These are our tech resource folks. Please fill in with whatever role assists teachers with technology.

This hyperdoc session can be done in 2 separate class sessions of 1 hour each, or as one 2 hour long session. It cannot be completed in 1 hour.

Download Here

Feedback is appreciated. @tisinaction on Twitter or comment here!

 

HyperDoc Resource: SAMR PD

It’s been awhile since I’ve shared a resource, so here’s the first one for this year. I’ve been working on learning about HyperDocs and making my own. I have the HyperDoc Handbook, and I’ve been referring to that to help guide me through this. Some people have told me that HyperDocs can be used for professional development sessions, so I thought I’d give it a try. I took a SAMR professional development I’d recently taught, and tweaked it to fit the HyperDoc style.

I have already shared this file to the TeachersGiveTeachers site, but I want to make sure I share it here as well.

Name: Level Up! With SAMR
Description: This HyperDoc is applicable to those who provide professional development to staff members. It focuses on an introduction to the SAMR method, and provides staff a chance to create a lesson integrating SAMR. The original includes an application piece with Padlet and a link to the survey that we always give our staff at the end. Please replace these with your own links.
Download Here

Feedback is much appreciated!