george couros

#IMMOOC: Open Sharing

Chapter 11 happened to focus on one of my favorite topics: sharing as an educator. I am always trying to get educators to see the power of online sharing and finding new ideas. I’ve already had the idea to try and get more educators using Twitter to seek ideas, even if they aren’t comfortable sharing their own work yet. I want them to see that the possibility of find new ideas is out there, and easily accessible.

When I first began teaching in 2009, I had no idea of the world out there that awaited me as an educator in terms of connections online. I was tech-savvy, but I didn’t know about the way that connections could have helped me as a first year teacher. It wasn’t something that was prominent back then, and it certainly wasn’t part of my course of study as an undergrad.

I joined Twitter in 2012. I can’t remember exactly why I did. I knew that I used that year to share my class’s stories on Twitter. I didn’t really interact with anyone else. It was a place where I could showcase student learning to parents. It’s been nearly 5 years since that time…and I didn’t start really using Twitter until after I became part of the TIS program. Now I couldn’t see myself doing without it.

Twitter only got better with Tweetdeck. My lists were so easy to read! What was this? I could follow hashtags and have lists of those! I made new connections and met those people at conferences and trainings. I found ideas and articles that changed my way of thinking and gave me new ideas.

If I had had all of this back when I first started teaching, I am sure I would have been an even better teacher. I wouldn’t have felt so isolated in my district. I would have been able to see out others to collaborate and connect with much earlier to reach beyond the sphere of influence in my small town world.

Today’s educators have access to all of this from the start, and yet they choose to ignore the benefits that they could find by connecting in the online world. It is a choice today to choose to stay disconnected. While that is up to each educator, they are making a clear choice to stay in a bubbled world. They are depriving themselves and their students of the ideas, connections, and collaboration that could be found online, if not through Twitter, then through some other means.

In the same sense, educators choose not to share their stories. They feel that they have nothing to share or contribute, or their work is not great. In this age of viral videos and news, it’s hard to feel like a simple lesson would wow the rest of the education world. And it won’t. Not everything that is shared will be the next best thing. However, each little story and idea contributes to a digital portfolio of the educator. Over time, over many years a story of growth and change emerges. We don’t have to say that we have spent time learning and trying many new ideas because our online footprint easily showcases that.

Want to show students the power of a digital portfolio? Show them yours. Model how you have created your portfolio, and let it be the springboard for theirs. Explain how it has provided you opportunities and experiences that weren’t possible before. Technically, I have two- my Twitter feed and this blog. If you go between both, you’ll get a pretty good idea of who I am as an educator, much more than if you had read only my evaluation from this year.

My growth and change is ongoing and always a progress. Yours is too. You share and I’ll share, and together, we only made the online world of educator a better place.

#IMMOOC: Less is More

This particular blog encompasses Chapters 10. It gave me a lot to think about, and some of it seems to contradict other things I’ve heard before. However, all kinds of viewpoints are helpful when figuring out one’s own way.

Districts often push for new initiatives and new tools. Often these ideas are added onto other things, or something else is dropped for the latest and greatest thing. Using tools doesn’t often last more than a year or so in many cases. It’s an ever changing game, and teachers are left feeling overwhelmed. As a district, we need to select our top 3 tools that we plan to use, and then the others can fall in around. These would be the 3 tools that every teacher should know and have access to use, as well as be trained on. It would then be on the ITRT to help train teachers in these areas.

At the same time, teachers should not be tied to only the three selected tools (or whatever each district selects). I often hear from teachers that they have no idea what’s really out there, so they don’t know what to request when it comes to professional development. I have developed a way to give teachers a taste of what’s out there through my new Fluco Toolbox series. This is meant to give brief overviews of new tools that teachers may or may not have heard of. They certainly are not expected to use these tools, but if they see something they like in the brief overview, then by all means, explore and use as seen fit.

When I think of my own district and the 3 possible tools that are being pushed, I think of:

  • G-Suite (including Google Classroom)
  • Chromebooks

I don’t really have a 3rd right now. I would have said Promethean boards/Classflow, but our high school does not yet have these tools. If we were to exclude the high school, then yes, it would certainly be my third choice. Thinking of this, I should probably consider offering a lot of professional development around these tools, but doing more than just the drive by overview. Overviews are great….until you’ve heard them multiple times. Then they just suck.

I loved Couros’ reference to Bernajean Porter’s levels of use with educational technology. For those unfamiliar they are:

  • literate: I can manipulate the device
  • adaptive: I can do traditional paper and pencil things with the device
  • transformative: I’m doing things that weren’t possible before

In some ways, it also reminds me of SAMR, but is a lot simpler in terms of the up and down. To me it seems like everyone needs to move beyond the literate and into adaptive/transformative. Not everything we do can be transformative, as there are times we need to do adaptive tasks, but we should be able to switch back and forth between the two comfortably, knowing when each is suitable.

Based on my reading this time, it seems like Fluco Toolbox will be the least invasive way to introduce new tools to teachers so that they know what is out there. They can read, review, and if they want to do more with it, great. They certainly won’t be expected to get it in their classrooms or to use it if they don’t want to do so.

In my own world, I need to focus on developing training on GSuite and Chromebooks that goes beyond the overview drive by introductions. This will take some time to work through, as I would need to figure out how to approach it, but I’m certain I can find some sources to get me started.

Needless to say, I’ve already made some notes to myself on my Note Board app, so I’m excited to see where my research will take me!

Teach Like a Pirate: Here We Go Again

In March of 2016, I began reading Teach Like a Pirate. I made it all the way to the “R is for Rapport” chapter before I stopped. Things got crazy, things got hectic. The end of the school year was upon me, and I was also job hunting at the time. Summer led to a new job, which led to a move to a different state and a start at a different school. The year became filled with searching and seeking and learning all about my new position.

Summer is once again upon me. Well, sort of. School is finished for the year, and teachers were finished on Tuesday or Wednesday (dependent upon if they were high school teachers who attended graduation or not). I am still finishing out the remainder of the days on my contract, and I’ll also have 2 weeks of KidsCollege to teach in there as well. I certainly don’t mind, especially since KidsCollege will pay me for teaching the things I love.

After KidsCollege comes Copenhaver Institute, which means I will get to meet two fabulous folks in education- George Couros and Dave Burgess. I have already received a package from the Copenhaver folks, and in this package was a copy of Teach Like a Pirate. We have been told that it is highly suggested that we read the book before the Institute. I already have my own copy of the book, but it was a reminder that hey, I’d better get my butt in gear.

So I am going to read the book again, and I am going to start from the beginning. I will end up reblogging about the 3 chapters I had already read. I am also going to continue the tradition of creating QR codes that link to my blog posts. These codes are printed and taped into the book on the corresponding chapter. That way I can easily go back to see what I wrote about that chapter, and if I have read it more than once and reflected, I can see how my thinking has changed with time.

So here we go again: Teach Like a Pirate: Round 2!

My Current EduReading List

There are plenty of books I need to read, and I have quite a few of them. These books have been recommended to me over time, and I’ve picked them up. So far, they’ve spent a lot of time on my shelf as I work my way through the school year. Reading is a passion of mine, but I usually only read before bed. This, of course, is under the cover of darkness, curled up in my bed with my Kindle. Reading helps me relax my brain and fall asleep more easily. Obviously this is not the ideal time to read any kind of reference material. Plus, I like to have physical copies of my reference books. This allows me to easily locate information or make any kind of marks I want. I’m not someone who marks up her books, but I do paste QR codes in them from time to time. The codes link to blog posts that I’ve written on that chapter or topic.

Most of the books listed work for anyone in education. Usually I find ways to link them to edtech or my own leadership in the field. There is always room to grow and room to learn.

Here are the books that are currently on my list to read and tackle. I’ve provided links to them on Amazon as well for easy purchase:

  1. The Innovator’s Mindset by George Couros: I actually started this in the fall and participated in half of #IMMOOC before I got busy with other things. I am going to finish the rest of this book first!
  2. Teach Like a Pirate by Dave Burgess: I started this book, and then I switched out of the classroom and into the technology specialist position, so I never finished it because I was learning the ropes of a new job at the time. I need to revisit it now that I am more comfortable in my position. Goal is before summer, as I get to see both Burgess and Couros speak at Copenhaver Institute!
  3. What Connected Educators Do Differently by Todd Whitaker: If you know me well enough, you know I love promoting being a connected educator and growing one’s PLN via social networks, such as Twitter, which is my main playground.
  4. The Art of Coaching by Elena Aguilar: All I know is that this is a must for me in my coaching position and that it will help me assist my teachers better. I’ve had multiple folks tell me to read it before next school year begins.
  5. Digital Leadership by Eric Sheninger: I have a copy of this book somewhere, but I can’t seem to find it right now. It may be at school. I want to create technological change in my schools, or at least see where I can begin.
  6. Lead Like a Pirate by Shelly Burgess: I’m in a unique leadership position as an ITRT and I want to see what new ideas this book will have to help me improve my leadership among my teachers. I think it’s geared toward admin, but I will find out. I want to be a better leader.

I have a lot to tackle, and I hope to jump back in soon. What’s on your current edureading list? Share in the comments section!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#IMMOOC: Inspiration

I started this post with the quote from the very beginning of the introduction to George Couros’ Innovator’s Mindset because it resonated strongly with me, even after I finished reading the section. Ever since I was little, I’ve been curious about the world around me. My interests have changed and evolved over the years, but no matter where I end up, I seem to be curious about learning new things. Perhaps this is why I hate click bait articles so much… I know they aren’t as good as they are made out to be, but my curiosity can’t resist at times.

Curiosity lends a lot to my desire to learn new things and to seek new information. As an educator, I’m eager to seek new opportunities for professional development to learn new things. I get to learn about GIS and makerspace next week, and I’m sure more opportunities will arise throughout the year. I am eagerly developing professional development for staff, and am so very proud of my effort to create some new connected educators. I tell many educators that all it takes is being motivated to want to learn something new, especially when it comes to my technology PD sessions.

Education should make us motivated and curious about learning. We should willingly seek new knowledge, be willing to share that knowledge openly with others. To me, this is the true purpose of education. And yet we send five and six year olds to school curious and eager to start, and by the time they graduate, they can’t wait to get out of school and move forward. They are done with school and all it entails.

Something has to change. The times are changing. The way we learn and the way kids learn is changing. School should no longer be the time where children sit and consume knowledge with bouts of time for them to explore their passions. No, not at all. School should encourage them to be creators, innovators, game changers. We expect them to change the way the world works, but how can we expect that if we don’t change the way their education works?

Innovation is a gateway to changing the game. It doesn’t happen overnight, but it can happen over time with dedication and passion. It’s my hope that after reading the introduction, that I’m in for quite a treat with the #IMMOOC. I can’t wait to continue!