professional development

PD Resource: Passwords 101 Lesson

I have been overseeing one of our governor’s school students as part of her community service. Emily seeks to work in cyber security in the future, and part of her project involves community service. We teamed up so that she could teach other teachers about the basics involved with cyber security through 30 minute professional development sessions. Her first lesson is on passwords.

Name: Passwords 101
Creator: This lesson was designed by BRVGS student Emily. I oversaw her work and creation, but the ideas inside are entirely hers.
Description: This lesson shows the audience how to create a secure password using a simple algorithm. Learners will be able to strength test their old passwords, determine the characteristics of good/bad passwords, and create their own sample password based on the presented algorithm

Passwords 101 Lesson

Feedback is appreciated. @tisinaction on Twitter or comment here!

 

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Student Designed Cyber Security PD for Teachers

For the past couple of weeks I have been working with a BRVGS student named Emily. Emily is a senior working on her final project for the governor’s school program, and one part of the project involves community service. She is interested in the cyber security field, and so her lead teacher suggested she team up with me, as I teach professional development to other teachers. Her goal for her service is to design and teach lessons on cyber security issues that teachers and others face online

I’ve been very pleased with the team up so far, as Emily is a very hard working student. I showed her how teachers begin to design and plan lessons, and she took to it like a fish to water. She decided the easiest thing to start with would be a lesson on passwords. She did a lot of research, and we narrowed down her ideas to teaching how to create password algorithms for a user. There are many different ways to create an algorithm for this, but Emily had found one that seemed to be pretty easy.

We planned and developed her lesson. She started with a hook that talked about what happens with easy passwords and how one person used this to his advantage with government servers. She has a link to a password strength test website where the audience can test the strength of their old passwords and see how long it might take a hacker to crack them. From there, she works with the audience to identify characteristics of good and bad passwords. With that in mind, she goes over the algorithm step by step, using the example of creating a password for a Google account. The audience then practices by creating a password with the algorithm for Facebook. Finally, she wraps up the lesson and asks a couple of exit questions.

Once she had all of her ideas out and in order, we worked on adding explanations. I wanted her lessons to be able to be understood by anyone looking over them, especially anyone who judges her final BRVGS portfolio. I created a simple lesson plan template for her to use, and she copied and pasted her lesson ideas into that so that things were neat and organized. She then decided to create a handout of the algorithm steps. I had to laminate a couple of copies for her teaching use, and then I also made plain copies so that teachers could take it with them.

It was a lot of work, and I hope she has been able to discover how much work can go into just one lesson plan. She’s enjoyed it though, and she’s ready to begin doing research for her next lesson. Now that she has one lesson plan under her belt, this one might turn out to be a little easier for her.

Though the lesson plan has been finished, Emily is not done just yet. She is gearing up to teach the lesson to teachers. She has practiced with family at home, and has brought a friend to my office space so I could listen as she taught the lesson to the friend. We currently have 1 teacher booked for a lesson in the next couple of weeks, and have some more to ask. Emily is planning to gather feedback from those teachers after each lesson, and I am giving them PD credit for helping out a student.

I hope to provide another update after we have worked with some of the teachers. I know Emily is going to do a great job. I know that I have already learned a lot from her, and I’m hoping other teachers will feel the same way.

Want Emily’s lesson? You can get it here!

 

#TLAP: Tone Makes a Difference

It’s been a crazy time, and last week school started for staff in Fluvanna County. Ever since Monday, it’s been a flurry of activity, but I have had time to begin incorporating new ideas and projects into my work already. One thing I have already done is changed how I present to staff, and the results were fantastic. Let’s travel back to August 1st…

On August 1st, I was at the high school to attend the opening day faculty meeting. I had been scheduled by the principal to present since the end of the previous year. Over the summer, I had developed a Slides presentation to introduce FlucoTech, and later I’d tweaked it to add in stuff about my role as an ITRT. My presentation already used Bitmoji images, as they are fun and draw the audience in. The only thing left was how I would present all of the information.

After meeting both Dave Burgess and George Couros in the early summer, I realized what a difference the way information is presented makes. This was further demonstrated by the Bowtie Tech Guys at WVSTC. How we share that information is just as important, and after this summer, anyone who tells me that students should simply learn the information because they have to should think again. As Burgess discusses in Teach Like a Pirate, we’re competing for students’ attention from so many outlets. If we can’t go with the flow and hook them on our material, we have lost them and we have lost out.

As teachers, we have attended professional development sessions where we loved hearing the presenter, and others where we’d rather gouge our eyeballs out because it was so boring. Think of how those sessions were presented though. Did they engage you? Did they draw on stories, jokes, imagery, videos, or some other form of showmanship? Think of how the “boring” sessions were presented now. Was it simply a presenter speaking in a bland manner while referring to some kind of slide presentation?

For my presentation, I grabbed my pirate flag and hat. This alone had folks curious. The image on the title screen of my slide was a bitmoji that said “Let’s taco about it”. My presentation was the last one scheduled on the agenda… over two hours into the faculty meeting. By this time, people are ready to go, they’re done, they’re bored. My teachers were high school ones, and they were quite a large group.

I immediately start with “Ahoy there!” and get a lackluster response. I remark to the principal that his crew must be dead, and then do it again. This time I get a much better response, and from there we are off and running. I’m loud, I’m animated, I’m working to get them to laugh. The information itself is not the most interesting to many of them and I know that, so I draw them in in other ways.

When I was finished, I heard many compliments from my teachers, and how they enjoyed the presentation. Some told me it was the best one of the morning, others appreciated the way I made them feel comfortable. I have since heard many more compliments, which lets me know I’m on the right track with engagement. I also had a lot of teachers reach out to me for help after that, which really contributed to my busy schedule at the high school last week.

In contrast, I have yet to do such a presentation at the middle school, and I do feel this has made a difference with the staff I have interacted with so far this year. The principal has mentioned having me present at a faculty meeting next week, but this is not set in stone just yet. We will see what happens when I do though.

Overall, I have found that tone and showmanship make all the difference. I am definitely heading in the right direction with my work, and will keep building on it throughout this year. All it takes is a small spark to make a big difference!

#LeadLAP: Rapport Scores

It doesn’t matter who you lead, whether it’s students, teachers, or staff in general. If you don’t have their trust, they aren’t going to respect you or assist you in your grand visions. You can have the greatest ideas in the world. They can be the best of the best, guaranteed to succeed, but if you don’t have a crew behind you that trusts your ideas and helps bring them to fruition, then your idea ship is sunk before it even leaves the harbor.

As someone in any leadership position, you cannot lock yourself behind your doors and hide behind emails and all-call announcements to staff members. Then you’re merely a ghost in the school, haunting, but never immersing yourself with your staff. By hiding, you’ve now created a barrier with a line that divides administration from staff.

I was lucky at one of my previous schools to work under a principal who was always around. Every morning she would go to each classroom and tell the kids hello and to work their best. She was often in the halls and with staff. When bad things happened to staff, she supported them. She participated in the events with the students, and did crazy things. If I needed to see her, it wasn’t that hard to get ahold of her at all. Her staff respected and trusted her, and it was easily seen. At one point there were rumors that she might leave the school for an administration position at another, and her staff fretted at the thought of losing her. She had built rapport, and it was easily seen.

On the other hand, I’ve been in places where this wasn’t so noticeable, or was only sometimes. Being under administration that is never seen or that rules with the fist of compliance makes for a stressful workplace. Instead of feeling trusted and respected, you feel as though you’re never working hard enough or never doing anything right. Some teachers simply give up and shrug, content to float along, convinced that this too, shall pass.

Myself, I am still getting better with this. I am going to make a better effort this year to be rapport with more folks in both of my schools, especially now that I am in my second year. The second year last time made the biggest difference, and instead of being timid and hesitant, I was jumping in and getting things done. I want to do that this year in this district as well. I don’t have to worry about not knowing my way around or how things really work in the district. Those barriers are gone. Time to take some action.

I recently ordered a pirate flag, mostly because I wanted something to always remind me of the PIRATE system. I still need to get the rod and clips for it, but part of me is now thinking one way to set myself apart and spark some interesting conversations is to carry my flag around the school with me everywhere I go on my first days back with staff. This may or may not also involve a pirate hat or bandana of some kind. Parading about like this while I do my job gets me the crazy looks, and lets me talk to any staff member who calls me out on my craziness. The first days are crazy and hectic, but I can make them memorable!

I’m still working on other ways to build rapport. I need to find ways to get myself into more classrooms this year and talk with more teachers. This is something I’m still thinking about and deciding upon. I can’t do much good from my office if I’m to be assisting staff. I know I need to build it though, and I have some ideas, but they aren’t enough just yet to share. The first step though, is KNOWING I need to do better in this area and improve!

#LeadLAP: Immersion Makes a Difference

One thing I’m quickly learning from my summer reading is that immersion can make all of the difference in how others perceive a lesson or activity. In Learn Like a Pirate, it was all about how the teacher immersed themselves when working with students. In Lead Like a Pirate it’s much the same thing, except with staff and teachers. Whether teacher or principal, those that look to you for guidance know when you’re really involved in the work and when you’re just sitting on the side lines instead.

As a teacher I remember my “off” days. I remember the days where I was ill and came to work sick or when I was having a rough time with a personal issue. I also remember the times I was just “done”. We have those down days. They don’t come often, but when they do, we are not at our best, and we are not immersed in what we’re doing either. Our students and teachers pick up on it. They know when your heart just isn’t into the work you’re doing.

Off days happen to everyone. No one is perfect and no one is “on” all the time, though we may try to be. The problem arises when we are “off” more than we are “on”. Perhaps you remember a teacher from your days who was just there floating on by. May you work with or have worked with some like that. Those teachers are the ones that also tend to have more trouble. Think about administrative staff, too. Have you been lucky enough to have some working right alongside you, or are they just there watching on the sidelines?

Being immersed in our work means getting down and dirty. We’re not just observing what’s going on and providing input. We’re not trying to accomplish other things at the same time. We’re in the middle of the learning, the action, and we’re setting the example for our staff and students that we want to be there by their sides as they make discoveries. We are showing them that we care about what is going on by placing ourselves right in the action as well.

Being immersed also allows us the chance to learn right alongside our students, and to make the adjustments as we go along. We learn more by being involved than by being hands-off. Our students and staff see the difference as well. Yes, we have our boundaries and borders, but does the border gap have to be so huge that it becomes an “US” and “THEM” situation? No. When that occurs, we start positioning ourselves as better than the group we are working with, and that never accomplishes much in the longterm. I would rather have an administrator getting involved in and learning PD alongside staff than one who decides not to attend or that it doesn’t apply.

In terms of myself as an ITRT, I need to begin keeping tabs on myself as I am working with staff during times of professional development. I need to watch for myself staying on the side, instead of being in the thick of things with the learners. I know there are times where I do this, and it’s not okay. I know this, and I definitely realize it now. I have knowledge to share, but that doesn’t make me the better person, or the expert. I am a learner still, too, and that means learning from my staff and the things they can teach me about the topic that we are exploring, together.

If nothing else, I need to make the “US” and “THEM” mentality turn into a “WE” mentality. Separately, barriers create issues and a lack of team, but a “WE” mentality smashes barriers and allows everyone to benefit from each other.

#LeadLAP: P is (still for) Passion

To switch up my reading a little as I am working on The Art of Coaching, I have also decided to read Lead Like a Pirate by Shelley Burgess and Beth Houf. I’m not an administrator, nor have any desire to be one, but I am in a bit of a leadership role as an ITRT. I do work with staff, and it is supposed to be my job to move them forward in the instructional technology field. I figured this book would do better to guide me in my role better than Teach Like a Pirate so I purchased it earlier this year shortly after it was released.

The section on passion is still broken into 3 sections- content (leadership in this case), professional, and personal. I’m not going to retype those, as I recently did them when I was studying Teach Like a Pirate. If you are really curious about what I did say, then you can read all about them here. Passions drive us and they are the things we love best. We must be cautious though, as not everyone gets why we’re passionate about our favorite things. For example, I’m pretty sure there are plenty of educators who would find me an oddball for my summer of learning that I’m embarking on, but that doesn’t bother me.

Instead, I am going to focus on a couple of the questions posed at the end of the chapter:

Do you know what each member of your staff is passionate about? If not how might you encourage your staff to bring more of what they are passionate about with them to work each day?

No, I don’t know what each of the staff members I work with is passionate about. I do know some, and those tend to be the folks I see the most often. I definitely can say that I don’t have a clue when it comes to the majority of my staff. I cut myself slack during the first year in a new district and state, but this year I need to do better in getting to know more of my staff and what drives them. Knowing their passions might help me do better with connecting the professional development and edtech that I do with staff. We already know that finding ways to connect our teaching to student’s interests pulls them deeper, so why not do the same with staff?

As to the question of how I can encourage staff to bring more of what they are passionate about to work, that’s a good question. I have been thinking about this one for awhile, and so far I am coming up with the idea for a passion board that can be displayed and viewed by others. I’m not quite sure how this would work, and it still needs to be thought about more.

How might you get to know the passions of your students and families? 

I can at least attest to a way I’m trying to get to know the students’ passions more. Usually I talk with students that I spot randomly and that helps me to learn a little about the student, even if I never see that student again. I “stole” fidget spinners from students last year in order to snag a chance to talk to them. It was a neat ice breaker and they opened up after they realized I wasn’t really going to take their spinner!

One thing I am starting to do next year is a student spotlight on our social media page. I plan to focus on on positives and impacts the student wishes to make, rather than achievement through sports or academics. It’s a spotlight for any student, and I want to find a way to display it at the school as well, especially if there are students who cannot be posted on social media, but their families wouldn’t mind them being featured in the hallways of the school. One of the questions will focus on student passions and what drives them.

Beyond that, it takes getting to know more students, and being that positive impact in the hallways. I am not sure how often I will work with students this year, as it always depends on the teacher requests. I will however, make sure they remember me!

Core Values Exercise

As I read Chapter 3 of The Art of Coaching, I came across the section on core values and beliefs. As humans, most of our actions stem from our core values. Aguilar provides an activity to complete to figure out one’s core values on her website, so I decided to give it a try. It was harder than I thought it would be!

The first step is to get ahold of a copy of the list of core values. This list can be printed, but I chose to save the PDF file and then use the Snipping Tool on my computer to mark up the document. Once a copy has been obtained, the first step is to circle the ten values you find most important. I used a highlighting pen for this part:

corevaluesstep1

I chose to highlight choice, creativity, fun, goals, imagination, making a difference, passion, personal growth, positive attitude, and trust as my 10 choices.

From the list of ten, you must then narrow the results down to just five. If you thought getting ten originally was hard, getting rid of five options is even harder. I found that it wasn’t too hard to narrow mine, as I felt some of the options were similar. I ended up with this:

corevaluesstep2

For this part I crossed off fun, goals, imagination, choice, and trust.

The final step of this activity is to cross off two more items, and end up with three left. These three items are most likely your core values, which you use almost subconsciously to guide your decisions in your life. Here’s my final worksheet image:

corevaluesstep3

I finally decided to cross off Making a Difference and passion. This left me with creativity, personal growth, and positive attitude as my core values.

Of course, I’m not finished just yet. With the completed worksheet in hand, there were also some reflection questions to answer:

1. Notice the feelings that come up when you read your short list. How does your energy shift?

Looking at my final three values, it seems as though these are the values I’ve been leaning toward most of this school year after being exposed to some amazing people and events. I feel like “Yes! Let’s get started and tackle some amazing things together! Let’s learn new things and grow!” It is a feeling that I love, and what makes me love my work the most.

2. Consider how the actions you take reflect your core values. Are there values that show up more often in your actions at work? At home? In social circles? With family? Do you ever notice a discrepancy between what you consider to be a “value” and actions that you take?

If I think about it, personal growth shows up most in my work life because I’m so into using Twitter to discover new ideas and books. I always strive to learn more and build connections. I feel like some of my work bleeds into my personal life, as it simply adds to the happiness I experience from my personal hobbies and interests. Creativity is often found when I work with children or am playing Minecraft. There are also the random times that I randomly make up songs or words, just because I can. It drives my fiance crazy sometimes, but she’s used to it by this point. Positive attitude is everywhere. I try to definitely be positive at work, but I usually am at home. I try to keep myself calm and stress-free, and I will often avoid situations that would upset this balance too much.

3. Write your three core values on a piece of paper and post them somewhere prominent. Reflect on them for a week or two. See if they still feel like “core” values.

Done. They are posted above my desk here at home, as that is where I spend the majority of my week days learning and growing.

4. Reflect on them every year. Are they the same? Have they changed? Do you think these would have been your core values 10 years ago?

Ten years ago I was 20 and still in college. During the summer of 2007 I would have been assisting with daycare and helping my mom. I was working toward my teaching degree at the time, and nearing the end of my time as an undergrad student. December 2008 was not so far away. I know that creativity would probably have still been a core value, as it has always been a part of me, and what has always helped me to be different as a teacher. I would guess that positive attitude might still be there, but it may not be. I do know that personal growth probably would not have. I was not too interested in doing anything to grow or push myself to really do better. At the time, I think I was just trying to survive college.

As to where my values might be in a year or even ten, who knows? Guess that’s why we look back and reflect!

Want to try the activity for yourself? You’ll need the directions here and you’ll need the list of core values as well.