fluco toolbox

Fluco Toolbox: Right Inbox for Gmail

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to schedule emails that need to be sent? What about make notes about an email or set reminders for followup involving a received email?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Right Inbox for Gmail

First, the basics:

Name: Right Inbox for Gmail
URL: Link here
Cost: FREE OR 5.95 per month for a yearly plan OR 7.95 per month for a monthly plan
Problem this tool solves: A Google extension that allows the user to schedule emails, set reminders, make private notes, and set recurring emails (paid option only).

I stumbled on this Google extension when I found myself wishing I could schedule emails. I thought Surely there’s some kind of extension for that! I went to the Chrome Web Store, and viola! I found Right Inbox for Gmail.

Once the extension is installed, refresh your inbox. When you compose an email, you’ll now see something like this:

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These are the new options added with the Right Inbox extension. We now have Send Later, Remind Me, Add Note, and Recurring (paid only).

Let’s start with “Send Later”. You’ll notice there’s still a “Send Now” option. First, compose the email that you wish to send. The drop down arrow beside “Send Later” provides the option to label the email as scheduled until it is delivered. This will show up in the Drafts section of the inbox.

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Click on “Send Later”. A box will pop up with some generic send later times. Don’t like those times? No problem. Click on “Customize this menu”, and you can remove the options you don’t like, and add in new ones. For example, if you know you often need to send a certain email on Monday at 9AM, you can add an option for “Monday at 9AM”. If you wish to send at a specific time, you’ll want to choose “At a specific time”. Then you can select the date and type in a time.

 

The email will be sent at at the specified time, and you’ll be relieved from having to remember to send it! If you later decide not to send the reply, simply go to your Drafts and delete the draft.

Guess what? You can also schedule a reply to a received message as well. Once Reply or Reply All has been selected, clicking “Send Later” will allow you to select the time to send a reply. The message will appear as a draft until the reply is sent. If you later decide not to send the reply, simply go to your Drafts and delete the draft.

Next, let’s look at “Remind Me”. When sending an email, this is a good way to leave a nudge to yourself to follow up, or to do something at a particular time. If I were to send an email, I might want to be reminded if no one responded so that I could get in touch again.

Once again, compose the email like before. Before clicking on “Send Now” or “Send Later”, check the box beside “Remind Me”, and set a time to be reminded. Clicking the drop down arrow will provide options. “Only if Nobody Responds” is a great one to use when requesting information from someone. Just as with scheduling, “Remind Me can be used for both composing and when reading messages.

 

Our next handy feature is “Add Note”. Add Note is useful when you want to write down some private ideas or notes that should be hidden from others as you compose the message. When reading email, “Add Note” is also available, perfect for jotting down ideas to track the conversation!

First, compose or read the email as usual. If composing, “Add Note” will be at the bottom of the screen with the other tools. Click the button, and a box will appear to type in the note. Make sure to save the note when finished. Clicking the drop down arrow will show more handy options, such as “Show Note Automatically”. This means the note will always appear when the message is opened. Once the email is sent, the note can be accessed by opening the email in the Sent folder. Notes are never visible to recipients.

 

When reading or replying to an email, the “Add Note” will be at the top of the screen. This time, use it to jot down ideas or thoughts from large threads of replies, or to compose your ideas before writing out an email response. The note will be visible any time the email is opened. The label “Note” will be applied, as seen in the email below:

 

The final option is “Recurring Email”. Since this is a paid feature, we won’t go into it in depth here. However, it functions just like the “Send Later” option, and adds in similar features to Google Calendar for recurring emails.

Hopefully, you find Right Inbox as handy as I do! It’s amazing the difference that one little extension can make!

Resources

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Fluco Toolbox: Timeline JS

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to have students do more than just another timeline on a poster? Have you ever wanted them to be able to create a timeline that was interactive with different multimedia elements embedded?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Timeline JS

First, the basics:

Name: Timeline JS
URL: http://timeline.knightlab.com/
Cost: FREE
Problem this tool solves: Create interactive timelines rich with multimedia tools. These timelines can easily be shared and saved. The timeline is created using a Google Spreadsheet template.

When I first began teaching in 2009 (I know, I know, I’m young!), this was the kind of tool I wished was around back then. Who hasn’t given a project that involved creating a timeline? Chances are, students created a timeline for a project on paper or posterboard, and it only showcased the date, the importance of the date, and maybe an image. It was a static timeline, and pretty basic as far as the information it represented.

Fast forward to today. Timeline JS is more than just a static timeline with pictures and information. Now links, Google maps, videos, and more can be embedded within the timeline, which is created through a Google Spreadsheet template.

Before I delve into how to use the tool, check out some of these created samples:

Nelson Mandela’s Extraordinary Life: An Interactive Timeline
Revolutionary User Interfaces

Those are definitely a step up from the timelines of days gone by! This post will introduce creating a timeline, but it is highly recommended that you watch the How To video under Resources to guide you.

The first thing that must be done when creating a timeline is to copy the template that Knightlab provides on their website. It can be retrieved here. This will save a copy of the Google Spreadsheet to your Drive.

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Once the template is downloaded, it’s time to edit the spreadsheet. Timeline JS instructs users to NOT edit anything in Row 1. These are the column headers, and should not be changed, as this will mess up the timeline. Though there is not a limit for how many slides can be used in a timeline, Knightlab recommends no more than 20 slides. This keeps the timeline from becoming too long and unengaging to the user.

Row 2 is where the timeline is begun. This will be the title slide in the timeline. Users should skip to Column J and give their timeline a title. Column K will provide a simple description of the timeline. Columns L-O deal with the media. This is where an image can be added. Provide the link to the image, and make sure to credit the creator.

Here is what mine looks like, both in spreadsheet and as a final timeline image. I have used an image that is saved on my Google Drive and shared publicly. There is no way to preview your timeline as you work, but you can use the Publish to the Web feature. To find the directions for this, refer to the video in the Resources section below. Once the timeline is Published to the Web, follow the directions at the bottom of the Knightlab homepage. Now you can preview as you work on the timeline simply by clicking the blue “Preview” button.

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Once the title slide is done, all that’s left are the information slides to go along with it. These will be done similarly to the title slide. First, input the date to use. You can be as specific as the time, but it’s not required. If there is an end date, such as with a battle that lasted multiple days, you can add that as well. After the date is entered, then do the media, and add captions where necessary. If importing images from a cloud-based storage, such as Google Drive, make sure you have set the sharing options to public. Finally, you can add a color background by putting in the HTML color code for the color you wish to use. Also, here is a link to all of the different types of media that Timeline JS supports and how to embed them in the timeline.

Here is a snapshot of the data for my timeline within the Google Spreadsheet:

timelinejs6

Here is a quick video sample of my timeline. Unfortunately, WordPress.com sites cannot have the timeline embedded into it. For a direct link to this timeline, go here.

For those importing images from Google Drive: One thing I noticed as I worked on my timeline was that I had to get a specific share link in order for my images to show up. Right click on the image to be shared, then change the share settings to “Anyone with the Link can View”. Once this is done, copy the link directly from that same screen by clicking the “Copy Link” button. If you only right click the image in the Drive and then “Get Shareable Link” the image won’t appear in the slideshow.

Once the timeline is set up to your liking, you can then refer to the website and make optional changes, such as font, starting slides, and more. There is a direct embed code, as well as a direct link. Here is the direct link to my timeline. I can always go back and make changes to my timeline in the future using the same Google Spreadsheet file. All changes to it are automatically updated in the link.

Enjoy creating your own awesome timelines!

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: Note Board App

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever had a great idea and scrambled to write it down on a post-it note? Later on, you couldn’t find that same note in your work space. What about a great idea on a trip? How can one manage everything together?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Note Board App

First, the basics:

Name: Note Board App
URL: https://www.noteboardapp.com/
Cost: Free (ads) OR $1.99 (ad-free)
Problem this tool solves: Use this tool to save ideas and notes on corkboard screens, no matter what device you’re using. There is a website, Android, and iOS version available. Create multiple boards, public boards, save web page info, and more

While there are many apps and websites out there that can do the same thing, Note Board App is one of my favorite note apps, mostly for its ability to sync across devices so that whether I’m out and about or at home, on my iPad or my Chromebook, I always have access to all of my notes. But… what else can this app do?

Create a board for your notes. You might have one for lesson plan ideas, one for inspirational quotes, and another for links to saved webpages of articles you want to read later. These boards are large, and the notes can be resized and dragged about. When a new note is created, you’ll have access to the Rich Text Editor, allowing you to customize the look of the note.

Capturewrgerf

Here is a board I have created to store ideas on revamping a workshop that I run for middle school students.

Organizing and taking notes is great. However, let’s take it to the next level. Create a board and share it with your colleagues in read-only access. They can view all of the information, but not change any of the data. Want them to be able to make changes? Give them permission. Want the whole world to see your board? Make it public! Your board will be viewable by anyone, but they will be unable to make any changes to it.

Create boards for more than just notes. Use the boards to save links to webpages, or embed YouTube videos. Use the Chrome or Firefox extension for Note Board to save and create notes on a webpage. This includes images, links to the page, and highlighting snippets of text.

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Here’s a board created about Icon for Hire. Videos have been embedded, as well as links to different websites/articles.

Your students can use this exact same tool for note taking. Instead of creating links in one location, videos in another, and notes still in another, use Note Board to have them create a board for their topic, and pin all information in the one space instead. They can refer back to their board on any device, meaning they aren’t limited to just their Chromebooks.

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A note created from text that I highlighted on Wikipedia. I only had to add the URL to my note.

Give Note Board App a try and see what you can create!

Resources

Here are some examples of boards that have been created for public viewing:

Music Board
Gift Ideas Board
Fan Board of a Band

Try the Demo Board and test out different ways to create notes before creating an account.

Fluco Toolbox: FlipGrid

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wondered if you could have students record video responses and spark a video discussion based around those responses? Wanted students to use a video format to reply back and forth to classmates?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: FlipGrid

First, the basics:

Name: FlipGrid
URL: http://www.flipgrid.com
Cost: FREE (FlipGrid One) OR $65 per year (FlipGrid Classroom)
Problem this tool solves: Allows teachers to pose a discussion question, and then students respond with a short video. Students can then respond back and forth to each other, and continue the discussion.

In the past, I have featured different tools for recording video on Chromebooks and in the Chrome browser. Today, I’m featuring a tool that allows students to record video, as part of a discussion response. Students can also respond to each others’ responses, creating a rich web of linked discussions, if done properly.

The premise is simple: a teacher creates a topic for a “grid”. Students then respond to the topic with a video response. Students can also view other students’ replies and respond to them. Teachers can leave feedback and assessment on student work.

Most teachers will ultimately stick with the FlipGrid One version, which is free. An educator is limited to creating one grid at a time, but they can always remove past content and replace with new content. Switching to the Classroom version will allow for unlimited grids, and let educators save them for future use. Students access a created grid with a code, and share their response. Grids can be hidden, and teachers can also turn off stats such as views and likes so that students are not focused on competing to see who is most popular. Grids can even be placed in “view only” mode so that students can only leave a response to the topic, and not to each other’s replies.

To sign up, simply go to http://www.flipgrid.com. Underneath the grid code box in the center of the page, there is a question that says “Are you an educator?” Click the link that follows. Once you have an account, you can go to the same page and click “Teacher Login” in the upper right corner.

Once an account is set up, a Grid will need to be created. If you are using the FlipGrid One version, you can only have one grid, so it’s best to give this grid an over-reaching name like “Mrs. John’s 5th Grade 1718”

It is not recommended to set your grid to “hidden”, unless you do not want anyone to be able to respond to it for a period of time. All grids must be accessed via a code by students.

With a Grid created, teachers can now set up topics for students to discuss. When creating a topic, teachers are asked to fill in some details. They will create a name, add the topic/question, set the maximum recording time for videos, and the date the topic should display. Click the blue “Create Topic” button and the topic will now be ready for students to create responses.

Screenshot 2017-09-20 at 11.01.35 AM

Speaking of students, any created topic can be viewed as a student would see it, and teachers can create video comments this way as well. This is an image of the student side for this topic:

Screenshot 2017-09-20 at 11.03.44 AM

Clicking the + in the green circle brings up the video recording screen. If this is the first time for recording, the site will ask for permission to access the webcam and microphone. A preview image of the video will be seen on the screen, and it will also track volume levels. Students will be reminded of the question once more, and they will also be alerted to the max time allotted for recording video. They simply click the red record button and they are off and rolling!

Screenshot 2017-09-20 at 11.05.02 AM

If you’re like me, and you like to have your key talking points in front of you, FlipGrid even has a Stickie feature that pulls out a yellow sticky note onto the screen. Key points can be jotted down, and will stay on the screen as the video records. No more forgetting what you wanted to say!

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Finally, it’s very easy to share with students. Teachers simply need to click the blue “Share” button and then select the Google Classroom icon at the bottom of the window.

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A new window will load, and Google Classroom will ask for the class the Topic should be shared to, and what kind of post should be created (announcement, assignment, question). From there, the teacher will have to fill out the usual post information for a Google Classroom post. Of course, Google Classroom isn’t the only way to share topics, so feel free to explore the other options as well!

If FlipGrid seems like a tool you’d like, give it a try. Check out some of the resources below!

Resources

 

Fluco Toolbox image created by Stephanie King (Fan) for this series. Please do not use without permission.

Fluco Toolbox: The Noun Project

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever needed to find a simple icon to visually show something, whether it’s for a website, lesson, or project?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: The Noun Project

First, the basics:

Name: The Noun Project
URL: http://www.thenounproject.com
Cost: FREE (must give attribution for images) OR $20 per year (EDU license- unlimited; no attribution required) OR $2 per icon
Problem this tool solves: Provides icons for just about any noun you can think of. Icons are created by other users. Simply search for a noun and explore the icons that appear.

This Fluco Toolbox tool is quite easy to explain. Teachers who need quick visual pictures or icons can easily search the many collections on The Noun Project, which are contributed by global users. First, create an account. This gives access to your icon history, which makes it easy to download an icon that has been used in the past, or look up attribution information.

Once an account has been created, simply search in the box for an icon. Below the search box, the site also gives some sample icons. This sampling often changes.

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For this tutorial I searched for Pokemon. My search results page looked like the following:

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At the top of the results are collections of images, usually from one of the icon creators. Below that are simply icons fitting the noun I searched for in the beginning. I simply search the icons and select the one I would like to use.

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 2.28.21 PM

The image is now shown in a large format, along with the option to download. I can also see what the image looks like in different colors, but as a free user I cannot download the image in color. This is a paid only option.

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 2.28.37 PM

Clicking on download gives me two file type options for the icon. For classroom purposes, the PNG format is the easiest to use in any program. SVGs can be downloaded with most programs, but may not work for everything.

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Next, I must choose whether I want a royalty free image, or a creative commons one. Choosing Royalty Free means I must pay $1.99 for the icon (unless I have a Pro account). Choosing Creative Commons means I will need to provide attribution each time I use the icon. Free accounts must choose Creative Commons.

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Once the image is downloaded, the screen will immediately let me copy the attribution text. This downloaded icon is also stored in the Icon History section of my account, should I ever need to find it again. I don’t have to worry about remembering the attribution text because it is also printed below the image. I can crop this off when I use the image, as long as I give credit in some fashion when I use the image. Credit must be given under the Creative Commons licensing used for these icons. Unsure of how to credit icons in different mediums? TheNounProject has created this guide to assist with this task.

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: Canva

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wanted to design quick and easy flyers, posters, or postcards? Have you wanted to have the design process to be simple, and easy to understand?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: Canva

First, the basics:

Name: Canva
URL: http://www.canva.com
Cost: Free OR $120 per year for Canva for Work
Problem this tool solves: Allows the user to create beautifully designed posters, flyers, and more. Templates for social media, documents, blogging, and more are also available.

If you need to create flyers or posters for an event, look no further than Canva. With this tool, you can design professional looking media within minutes. Simply choose a design template, add your own text and images, and then download the result.

It’s easy to log into Canva if you’re part of a Google district. When logging in, choose the Google option and you’ll be set. Once you’ve logged in, you’re taken to your dashboard, where all created designs will be housed. From here, you have the option to create a new design as well. First, click the Create a Design button to the left of your screen.

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You’ll be taken to a new screen with different templates. Many of these are formatted to a correct size for various websites. For example, the Facebook ad and Twitter post are sized perfectly for those sites. The same goes for documents. Flyers are sized to 5 x 7 inches, and a magazine cover is 8.5 x 11 inches. Choose the type of design you want to create, but don’t worry about what it looks like at this point.

Once a design is chosen, you’ll be taken to a new page, ready to begin editing. For the purposes of this post, I have chosen to do a flyer. The first step once the page has loaded is to choose a layout design. There are many choices on the left side, but many are not free. Make sure the one you select has a “free” label in the lower right corner. This time I selected a winter themed flyer.

Screenshot 2017-09-29 at 1.13.25 PM

Now that I have my work selected, I can work on modifying the text and background if I want. To edit text, double click on the words and a text box will appear. You can change font styles, layout, and color. You can also move the textbox to another location on the page.

Screenshot 2017-09-29 at 1.17.19 PM

Don’t like what you see on the current template? Add it yourself! You can use the Elements feature on the left side of the page to add shapes, lines, and more to the flyer.

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It’s easy to change the background as well. Simply click the background tab on the left side of the screen. Then you can select to use one of Canva’s free backgrounds or upload your own.

In addition to adding elements, text and images can be uploaded as well. Canva does have a small library of free images that can be used on their site.

Perhaps one of the most important things to remember is to save often. Canva will automatically save your work, but don’t always rely on this method. If you need to save, go to File, then Save in the upper left corner.

Screenshot 2017-09-29 at 1.23.32 PM

When the design is finished, download the result. Choose Download in the upper right area, and then choose the file type. PDF is going to be your best option, but you can download the design as an image as well.

Screenshot 2017-09-29 at 1.36.07 PM

A tip to remember with Canva: template size matters. If you want to make a flyer, but want it to be bigger than 5 x 7, you’ll need to choose a different design template. Canva will not let you resize any template unless you are a paid member. Try to find the template size you want to work with first. Everything else can be modified and changed later on.

Resources

Fluco Toolbox: GoSoapbox

Welcome to Fluco Toolbox, a series of posts that showcases potential edtech tools for the Fluvanna County classroom. Each post will discuss the tool, the type of problems it can help solve, and how it can be used in the classroom. If you’re a Fluvanna County staff member and want to learn more about using the tool in your own classroom, please schedule to see your ITRT and we will develop professional development based around your needs. If you’ve stumbled upon this post and you’re not part of the district, no worries! Feel free to use the information provided to jumpstart your own research.

Have you ever wished to have a way to communicate with students during lessons? A place where you can create polls, easily gauge student confusion at any point in the lesson, create quick quizzes for feedback (with a downloadable gradesheet), AND not have to worry about students needing accounts?

Today’s Fluco Toolbox tool is: GoSoapBox

First, the basics:

Name: GoSoapBox
URL: http://www.gosoapbox.com
Cost: FREE with paid options for classes larger than 30 students
Problem this tool solves: This tool lets you create an event for students to join where you can easily gauge confusion, create quizzes, polls, and discussions, and get feedback, with no need for students to have accounts.

GoSoapBox combines the ease of use of multiple tools/websites into one. If you are looking for a tool that combines the likes of PollEverywhere, Google Forms Quizzes, TodaysMeet, and Google Classroom Questions, then this is the tool for you. While it may not share the robust variety of features that some of these tools have individually, it manages to combine them into one large tool, that’s easy to use in a classroom.

Teachers using GoSoapBox are able to have students participate in an “Event” by entering a code to join. Students never need to create an account. Once the students are signed into the event, teachers can easily do a multitude of things. They will be able to gauge overall student confusion at any time during the lesson. Teachers can create a quiz that will collect student answers for teachers to grade later. They can also create a simple poll, or open a discussion question to be answered. Social Q & A is another feature where students can ask questions, and others can upvote them if they also share the same question.

Perhaps one of the nicest features of running an event on GoSoapBox is that multiple activities can be running at a time. Teachers can have a quiz open and a poll at the same time. Activities within an event can be locked and unlocked, and changed at will. Events are saved in the teacher’s dashboard, so they can set up activities for an event in advance. Activities can also be disabled. Social Q & A may be a tricky feature to teach students to use properly, so teachers are free to disable this option.

GoSoapBox is free for the basic account. The basic account lets you have up to 30 students signed into an event at one time. For most teachers, this is perfect. Upgrades are available, but the cheapest starts at $99 for 6 months, and allows teachers to have up to 75 students in a class at a time. Larger upgrades are also available, but these are better suited for large college classrooms.

Getting started on GoSoapBox is easy. Teachers will need to create an account and make sure all information is verified once they sign up. They’ll then be taken to their dashboard, which will look similar to the image below, minus the already created event:

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 8.53.41 AM

To create an event, simply select “Create” in the Your Events box. A new screen loads, and simply asks for a name for the new event.

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 8.53.56 AM

Give the event a name, and that’s it! The new event is created.

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 8.54.18 AM

Once the event has been created, teachers will be able to configure the event through the “Moderation Portal”, as well as copy down the join code for their class. The code will still be available once teachers leave this page, so teachers don’t have to worry about copying the code right away if they’d prefer not to do so.

Speaking of the Moderation Portal, teachers can complete a variety of tasks. Features for the event can be enabled or disabled as needed. Teachers can invite another teacher to moderate the event, or change the event details. The event can be archived and deleted from this screen. Teachers can also export data.

 

Events are never “closed” (unless archived). To open an event, simply click on the event name on the dashboard. The teacher’s screen appears as so:

Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 9.07.46 AM

Teachers can now create any of the activities. This can be done in advance or on the fly. Activities are locked and unlocked by the teacher as needed when it’s time for students to give a reply. If teachers need the join code for students, all they have to do is click “Moderate This Event” at the bottom of the screen and the access code will appear at the top of the page that loads.

The possibilities for this tool are large, and if you’ve used it in your classroom, let me know in the comments! I would love some ideas to pass along to others.

Resources